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Vivity Fever

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WHAT IS FEVER

Fever is one of the most common and prominent symptoms of various illnesses like flu, cough and colds, and infections.1,2 It may also cause decreased appetite and increased sweating that can lead to fluid and electrolyte loss.3

 

COMMON SYMPTOMS OF FEVER:

WHY HYDRATION IS IMPORTANT IN FASTER RECOVERY

Though common, fevers still manage to get in the way of daily activities of kids. Parents worry as their child may weaken even more due to the lack of appetite and decreased fluid intake.

Hydration plays a vital role in fever recovery. In children, an additional 10% of the recommended maintenance fluids is needed for every temperature degree rise above 38°C.4

 

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HOW TO MANAGE FEVER

Common practices when managing fever at home:

  • applying fever gel patches and other methods to cool the body down
  • bed rest
  • Increasing fluid intake

When it comes to fever restoration and hydration, water may not be enough, and electrolytes should also be replaced.5 The use of appropriate solutions, such as electrolyte drinks, corrects and helps prevent electrolyte disturbances.6

Though solutions exist in the market, there are added challenges that must be dealt with in treating fever and its symptoms.7

  • poor taste
  • error in preparation
  • lack of compliance

 

COMMON ISSUES WITH ELECTROLYTE DRINKS ON THE MARKET:

Vivity is the doctor-recommended, scientifically formulated, fuss-free electrolyte drink in flavors that kids love and can help them bounce back faster.8,9

  • Each serving of Vivity contains optimal levels of sodium and glucose that help to ensure better hydration compared to drinking water alone.10
  • Filled with electrolytes that help with normal cell, nerve, and muscle function
  • Packed with carbohydrates that help provide energy.

 

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Now available in Lazada, Mercury Drug, Watsons, Rose Pharmacy and Southstar Drug. Click on the icons below to buy!

 


1. Ogoina D. J Infect Public Health. 2011 Aug;4(3):108-24. doi: 10.1016/j.jiph.2011.05.002.
2. Ward, Mark. Patient education: Fever in children (Beyond the Basics) https://www.uptodate.com/contents/fever-in-children-beyond-the-basics. Last modified Oct 2017. Accessed March 2020.
3. Maes, M., Berk, M., Goehler, L. et al. BMC Med. 2012 Jun 29;10:66. doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-10-66.
4. Fluid and Electrolyte Therapy. In: Core Concepts of Pediatrics. [2nd edition]. Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch. 2017.
5. Lewis LL, Dehydration. MSD Manual Consumer version. https://www.msdmanuals.com/home/hormonal-and-metabolic-disorders/water-b.... Updated June 2020. Accessed 2020.
6. Canavan A, Arant BS. Am Fam Physician. 2009 Oct 1;80(7):692-696.
7. van Hoey N. Dehydration in Outpatients. Assessments, Risks, and Treatment. http://www.ncpa.co/issues/APMAY15-CE.pdf. Published 2015. Accessed 2020.
8. ORSL Rehydrate. Data on file.
9. World Health Organization Child Health and Development. Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS): A New Reduced Osmolarity Formulation. http://rehydrate.org/ors/expert-consultation.html. Accessed 2020
10. World Health Organization Child Health and Development. Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS): A New Reduced Osmolarity Formulation. http://rehydrate.org/ors/expert-consultation.html. Accessed 2020. 2. Vivity Mode of Action. Data on file.